Wine for you and your feline is on sale for National Drink Wine With Your Cat Week

Clink clink, y'all.
Image: petwinery

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Drinking wine alone with your cat is an unspoken rite of passage to becoming an adult. And if you find yourself turning down plans because you’re “busy” when in reality you’re just going home to sip Merlot while Fluffy snuggles into you on the couch, you might want to keep reading. is combining two post Valentine’s Day holidays, National Drink Wine Day on Feb. 18 and National Love Your Pet Day on Feb. 20, to create one massive holiday week that I personally have been waiting my entire life for: National Drink Wine With Your Cat Week. It’s running from Feb. 19 to Feb. 23, and it’s amazing.

Okay so it might be made up, but aren’t all holidays technically made up? And who cares, because wine is on sale at multiple retailers and that’s something we will never complain about. Remember the non-alcoholic cat wine trend from a few years back? It’s totally still a thing and it’s also on sale. 

Check out the best deals on wine for the upcoming week — we encourage stocking up as much as possible.

For your cat

The PetWinery is your cat’s best bet for Wine Wednesday as they stock all things animal mocktails at the Pet Bar. The menu includes cat champagne and cat wine, because after a long, hard day of being a cat, they need a little something to take the edge off, too.

The drinks are non-alcoholic, but they are rich in fish oil, which is said to have multiple health benefits for cats. Choose from flavors like Meowsling, Purrgundry, and Mëow & Chandon, and take 20% off any order with this exclusive coupon code.

For you

Image: martha stewart wine co.

Here’s the stuff you really care about. With five retailers offering discounts on wine from too many brands to count, we’d say the possibilities are truly endless. If you’re too impatient to wait for bottles to come in the mail, check out alcohol delivery services like Drizly and get a bottle or five delivered to your doorstep in an hour. 

More deals on wine for National Drink Wine With Your Cat Week: On Feb. 18, take 10% off your first order and 10% off when you buy six bottles or more. Plus get $20 off orders over $100 for new customers.

Martha Stewart Wine Co: Save up to 25% on Martha’s picks including Sauvignon Blanc, Moscato, Malbec, and many types of Rosé.

WSJ Wine: Get dry reds and whites starting at $9.99.

Uncorked: Save 10% on all orders.

Minibar Delivery: Get $10 off any order for new customers.

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Think twice about buying ‘squashed-faced’ breeds, vets urge dog-lovers

British Veterinary Association launches #breedtobreathe campaign to highlight serious health issues breeds such as pugs and French bulldogs are prone to

Vets have urged dog-lovers to think twice about buying squashed-faced dogs such as pugs and French bulldogs, after many would-be owners were found to be unaware of the health problems such breeds often experience.

According to data from the Kennel Club, registrations of squashed-faced, or brachycephalic, breeds have shot up in recent years: while just 692 French bulldogs were registered in 2007, registrations reached 21,470 in 2016.

Certain DNA variations in dogs are linked to a short skull shape. The animals baby-like faces with large, round, wide-set eyes and flat noses are known to be a key factor in why owners choose such breeds: over time those traits have been bred for, and in some cases have been taken to extremes.

This selective breeding and prioritising appearance over health has left the breeds prone to skin disorders, eye ulcers and breathing difficulties among other problems.

Now the British Veterinary Association (BVA) has launched a campaign dubbed #breedtobreathe to draw attention to the issues, revealing that a new survey of 671 vets found 75% of owners were unaware of the health problems of brachycephalic breeds before they chose their squashed-faced dog. Moreover the vets said just 10% of owners could spot health problems related to such breeds, with many thinking that problems including snorting were normal for such dogs.

Brachycephalic dogs graph

The survey also revealed that 49% of vets thought advertising and social media were among the reasons behind the surge in ownership of these dogs, while 43% said celebrity ownership was one of the driving factors.

We find that our veterinary surgeons are finding increasing numbers of flat-faced dogs are coming into their practices with problems which are related to the way these animals are made, said John Fishwick, president of the BVA. One of the things that is causing this increase that we have seen over the last few years appears to be celebrity endorsements and their use in advertising.

Among those criticised by the BVA are pop star Lady Gaga, who is often photographed with her French bulldogs, and YouTube star Zoella, whose pug features in her videos. Big brands are also targeted; the organisation revealed that Heinz, Costa and Halifax have all agreed to avoid using squashed-faced dogs in future advertising.


What sort of health problems do brachycephalic dogs have?

Breeds such as pugs, bulldogs, French bulldogs and boxers are prone to a range of health problems, many of which are related to their short skulls and other characteristic features.

Breathing problems

Brachycephalic breeds often have narrow nostrils, deformed windpipes and excess soft tissues inside their nose and throat all of which can lead to difficulties with breathing, which can also lead to heart problems. The dogs are also prone to overheating.

Dental problems

The shortened upper jaws of squashed-faced dogs means their teeth are crowded, increasing the risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

Skin disorders

The deep folds around the dogs faces, such as the characteristic wrinkles of a bulldog, also bring problems as they are prone to yeast and bacterial infections.

Eye conditions

The head shape and prominent eyes of brachycephalic breeds means the dogs are at risk of eye conditions including ulcers. Among the causes of eye ulcers is that brachycephalic dogs often cannot blink properly and have problems with tear production, while eyelashes or nasal folds can also rub the surface of their eyes.

Birth problems

Brachycephalic breeds can have difficulties giving birth naturally because of the disproportionate size of the puppies heads, meaning that caesarean sections are often necessary. According torecent researchmore than 80% of Boston terrier, bulldog and French bulldog puppies in the UK are born in this manner.

The BVA is urging people to send letters to brands asking them not to use such dogs in promotional material. The campaign also aims to raise awareness of potential health problems of squashed-face breeds, and stresses the need for vets, owners, dog-show judges, breeders, researchers and others to work together to make sure the breeds are healthy.

They are lovely breeds of dog, they are very friendly and they make good pets, said Fishwick. The problem is a lot of them are really struggling, and we really want to make sure people understand this and encourage them to think about either going for another breed or a healthier version of these breeds ones which have been bred to have a longer snout or possibly even cross breeds.

The BVA warned that without action, the number of corrective surgeries needed on such animals will soar.

Caroline Kisko, secretary of the Kennel Club urged owners to do their homework before buying a squashed-faced dog. As soon as you get a market drive then the puppy farms just say ooh well breed those now, she said.

But Dr Rowena Packer of the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) said the problem is not confined to new owners, with recent research from the RVC finding that more than 90% of pug, French bulldog and English bulldog owners said they would own another such dog in the future. It is not just going to be a flash in the pan that we see this huge surge and then it goes away, she said.

It has been suggested that vets may be unwilling to speak out for fear that owners will simply take their pets elsewhere, damaging business.

But Packer disagrees, saying: I dont think any vet went into [the job] hoping that their salary would be paid by the suffering of dogs who have been bred to effectively have problems.

Dr Crina Dragu, a London-based veterinary surgeon, noted that not all squashed-faced dogs have problems. You see the ones that have happy lives, normal lives, and you see the ones that the minute they are born they spend their entire lives as though [they are being smothered] with a pillow all day, every day, she said.

Packer said prospective owners should be aware squashed-faced dogs can be an expensive commitment: I think they need to be aware of both the emotional and financial hardship that they could be putting themselves and their dogs through for potentially five to 10 years.

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Labrador puppy stolen by thieves returned to ‘devastated’ little girl

Eight-week-old labrador puppy, Sasha, was stolen from a family.
Image: victoria police

An eight-week-old puppy that was stolen from a house in Melbourne, Australia, has been returned to a “devastated” family after local police launched a public appeal.

A number of items including a laptop, an iPad and jewellery were also stolen from the home on Monday. 

Yet it was the missing labrador, Sasha, that distressed the family most — especially the daughter of the dog’s owner, four-year-old Maia.

“We’ve only had her a week, but she’s part of the family. She was my daughter’s best friend, and those two spent each night falling asleep together in the dog bed,” Sasha’s owner, Ryan Hood, told Today.

Police failed to find the dog anywhere in the home or in the neighbourhood, and a investigation was launched. But on Thursday, Sasha mysteriously returned to the family’s home. 

Hood’s wife woke up to make a coffee, when she noticed a moving figure by the kennel. It turned out to be their missing dog.

“We think that whoever took her had either a conscience, or got scared and dropped her over the fence … we don’t care to be honest. We’re happy to have her back,” Hood told Today on Thursday.

Hood said his daughter, Maia, was “ecstatic” as was the dog. The dog appeared to be unharmed and in good health, although has a fascination with shoes now.

None of the other stolen items were returned, and Victoria Police said it’ll still be investigating the burglary. 

Through all the bad, fortunately there’s still a little bit of good left in this world.

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Penguins starving to death is a sign that somethings very wrong in the Antarctic | John Sauven

Overfishing, oil drilling, pollution and climate change are imperilling the ecosystem. But ocean sanctuaries could help protect what belongs to us all, says Greenpeace director John Sauven

The awful news that all but two penguin chicks have starved to death out of a colony of almost 40,000 birds is a grim illustration of the enormous pressure Antarctic wildlife is under. The causes of this devastating event are complex, from a changing climate to local sea-ice factors, but one thing penguins, whales and other marine life dont need is additional strain on food supplies.

Over the next year we have the opportunity to create an Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary the largest protected area on Earth which would put the waters off-limits to the industrial fishing vessels currently sucking up the tiny shrimp-like krill, on which all Antarctic life relies.

In 1990, the Voyager 1 space probe looked back at Earth from six billion kilometres away and took a historic selfie of our solar system. What it saw, according to renowned astrophysicist Carl Sagan, was a pale blue dot.

Our planet is a blue planet, echoed David Attenborough, in his opening words to the BBCs landmark Blue Planet series. With over 70% of our world covered by water, this is no exaggeration. Our oceans can be seen from across the solar system.

The majority of this water falls outside of national borders. In fact, almost half of our planet is a marine natural wonder outside the boundaries of flags, languages and national divisions. These vast areas cover 230 million square kilometres, and they belong to us all. To give a sense of scale, thats the size of every single continent combined, with another Asia, Europe and Africa thrown in for good measure. The size of our oceans may seem overwhelming. Our collective responsibility to protect them, however, should not.

It wasnt long ago that the oceans were thought to be too vast to be irrevocably impacted by human actions, but the effects of overfishing, oil drilling, deep sea mining, pollution and climate change have shown that humans are more than up to the task of imperilling the sea and the animals that live there.

A humpback whale dives for krill in Wilhelmina Bay, off the Antarctic Peninsula. The creeping expansion of industrial fishing is targeting the one species on which practically every animal in the Antarctic relies: krill. Photograph: Charles Littnam/WWF/EPA

All of us who live on this planet are the guardians of these environments, not only to protect the wildlife that lives in them, but because the health of our oceans sustains our planet and the livelihoods of billions of people.

Heres the good news. The tide of history is turning. We on the blue planet are finally looking seriously at protecting the blue bits. Just a few months ago, in a stuffy room far from the sea, governments from around the world agreed to start a process to protect them: an ocean treaty.

This ocean treaty wont be agreed until at least 2020, but in the meantime momentum is already building towards serious and binding ocean protection. Just last year a huge 1.5 million sq km area was protected in the Ross Sea in the Antarctic. In a turbulent political climate, it was a momentous demonstration of how international cooperation to protect our shared home can and does work.

Over the next two weeks, the governments responsible for the Antarctic are meeting to discuss the future of the continent and its waters. While limited proposals are on the table this year, when they reconvene in 12 months time they have a historic opportunity to create the largest ever protected area on Earth: an Antarctic Ocean sanctuary. Covering the Weddell Sea next to the Antarctic peninsula, it would be five times the size of Germany, the country proposing it.

The Antarctic is home to a great diversity of life: huge colonies of emperor and Adlie penguins, the incredible colossal squid with eyes the size of basketballs that allow it to see in the depths, and the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale, which has veins large enough for a person to swim down.

The creeping expansion of industrial fishing is targeting the one species on which practically every animal in the Antarctic relies: krill. These tiny shrimp-like creatures are crucial for the survival of penguins, whales, seals and other wildlife. With a changing climate already placing wildlife populations in the Antarctic under pressure, an expanding krill industry is bad news for the health of the Antarctic Ocean. Even worse, the krill industry and the governments that back it are blocking attempts at environmental protection in the Antarctic.

Ocean sanctuaries provide relief for wildlife and ecosystems to recover, but its not just about protecting majestic blue whales and penguin colonies. The benefits are global. Recovering fish populations spread around the globe and only now are scientists beginning to fully understand the role that healthy oceans play in soaking up carbon dioxide and helping us to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Sanctuaries encourage vital biodiversity, provide food security for the billions of people that rely on our oceans, and are essential to tackling climate change. Our fate and the fate of our oceans are intimately connected.

Creating the worlds largest ever protected area, in the Antarctic Ocean, would be a signal that corporate lobbying and national interests are no match for a unified global call for our political leaders to protect what belongs to us all. The movement to protect over half our planet begins now, and it begins in the Antarctic.

John Sauven is director of Greenpeace

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These Animals Love To Dance! (15 Hilarious Memes)

I guess we all just gotta shake it when we hear that beat! 

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