Weapons cache found at Las Vegas shooter’s home

(CNN)Stephen Paddock, who sent bullets and terror down on thousands attending a Jason Aldean concert in Las Vegas, had an arsenal in his 32nd-floor hotel room and at his home 80 miles away, officials said.

Police recovered 23 guns from his Las Vegas hotel room and another 19 guns from Paddock’s home in Mesquite, Nevada, Clark County Assistant Sheriff Todd Fasulo said.
Authorities said Paddock killed 59 people and injured another 527 early Monday in the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history.
    In the hours after the retired accountant committed the shooting, authorities rolled out frightening new details, including the discovery of scopes on rifles at the resort and explosives at his home.

    But what they couldn’t explain is why the man who had never faced any notable criminal charges did it. There was no known motive late Monday.
    Even Paddock’s brother had no answers.
    “We’re still just completely befuddled. Dumbstruck,” Eric Paddock said in Orlando, Florida.

    Latest developments

      These concertgoers hid in a freezer

    — A team of six officers spoke with security at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, where Paddock was staying, and searched the hotel floor-by-floor Sunday night before they found Paddock’s room, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters.
    — Paddock, 64, fired at the officers through the door, Lombardo said. A SWAT team broke down the door, but Paddock had already killed himself, Lombardo said.
    — Authorities recovered 23 guns from Paddock’s room, said Clark County NV Assistant Sheriff Todd Fasulo. Lombardo said several of the rifles had scopes on them.
    — Another 19 firearms, along with explosives and several thousand rounds of ammunition in Paddock’s Mesquite, Nevada, home. The gunman apparently had smashed out two windows to increase his range of targets.
    — The sheriff said a SWAT team was standing by at a house in northern Nevada. A law enforcement official confirmed the FBI is present in Reno.
    — Several vigils were held Monday night to honor the victims of the shooting. Communities came out in Reno, Las Vegas and at the campus of University of Nevada Las Vegas.
    — Sandra Casey, a special education teacher in Manhattan Beach, California, was killed, the Manhattan Beach Unified School District said. “We lost a spectacular teacher who devoted her life to helping some of our most needy students,” school board President Jennifer Cochran said.
    Sonny Melton also was identified as among the dead. His employer, Henry County Medical Center in Paris, Tennessee, said Melton was a registered nurse. His wife survived the shooting.
    — Police had no prior knowledge of the gunman before the attack,Lombardosaid. “I don’t know how it could have been prevented,” he said.
    — Paddock bought multiple firearms in the past, but investigators believe the firearms were purchased legally, a law enforcement official said. The official said initial reports suggest at least one rifle was altered to function as an automatic weapon.
    — Chris Michel, owner of Dixie GunWorx, in St. George, Utah, recalled selling Paddock a shotgun earlier this year, CNN affiliate KTVX reported. “He talked about how he just moved closer to where we are,” Michel said of Paddock. “He said he was visiting local firearms shops.” Paddock lived in Mesquite, Nevada, about 35 miles from St. George.

    ‘Everyone’s dying around me’

    Witnesses described the horror that unfolded.
    Taylor Benge said he “could see a guy with a bullet wound right in his neck, motionless,” several feet away. “From there on … people just started dropping like flies.”
    Alexandria Cheplak, 25, called her father as she ran from the bullets.
    “Everyone’s dying around me,” Jon Cheplak recalled her saying. “Everyone’s dying. They shot my friend … I’ve got to get out of here.”
    Police said Paddock, unleashed a hailstorm of bullets from the 32nd floor of the resort, Lombardo said Monday.
    Authorities are still piecing together a motive.
    “I can’t get into the mind of a psychopath,” the sheriff said.
    Mayor Carolyn Goodman described the gunman as “a crazed lunatic full of hate.”

    Festival turns into massacre

      Deadliest mass shootings in modern US history

    Benge lauded the heroics of his sister, who “threw herself on top of me and said, ‘I love you, Taylor,'” he said.
    “Even after an hour and 30 minutes, I didn’t know if I was safe.”
    Witness Bryan Hopkins said he survived by jumping into a walk-in freezer at the Mandalay Bay hotel.
    “There must have been, I don’t know, 23 to 30 of us inside this freezer,” he said.
    Corrine Lomas recalled the heroism of fellow concertgoers, risking their lives to save others.
    “A lot of really good people (were) holding people’s wounds shut, trying to help them while everybody was just ducked down,” she said.

    The investigation

    Police said they believe Paddock acted alone. “Right now, we believe it’s a sole actor, a lone-wolf-type actor,” the sheriff said.

    So far, the massacre has no known link to overseas terrorism or terror groups, a US official with knowledge of the case said.
    And a woman who was described as a “person of interest” after the attack is now not believed to be involved in the shooting, police said in a statement.
    “Marilou Danley is no longer being sought out as a person of interest,” the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said. “LVMPD detectives have made contact with her and do not believe she is involved with the shooting on the strip.”
    The gunman’s brother, Eric Paddock, said he was stunned to learn Stephen was believed responsible.
    He described his brother, a retired accountant, as “a wealthy guy. He liked to play video poker. He went on cruises.”
    The last time Eric Paddock spoke to his brother was when Stephen texted him, asking how their mother was doing after losing power from Hurricane Irma.
    Eric Paddock said he knew his brother owned a few handguns and maybe one long rifle, but said he did not know of any automatic weapons.

    Blood donations needed

    With hundreds of victims still hospitalized, officials feared the death toll will rise.
    The sheriff implored the community to donate blood. And hundreds of Nevadans did exactly that.
    Shanda Maloney tweeted a photo while she stood in line at 4:30 a.m.
    “This. Is. Vegas. This is our community. These are our people. Thank you to everyone here donating,” she tweeted.
    Maloney told CNN she also gave transportation to anyone who needed it after the attack.
    “I just started picking people up and giving people rides,” she said.

    Aldean speaks out

    Aldean posted a statement on Instagram saying that he and his crew were safe.
    “My Thoughts and prayers go out to everyone involved tonight. It hurts my heart that this would happen to anyone who was just coming out to enjoy what should have been a fun night,” he wrote.

    Tonight has been beyond horrific. I still dont know what to say but wanted to let everyone know that Me and my Crew are safe. My Thoughts and prayers go out to everyone involved tonight. It hurts my heart that this would happen to anyone who was just coming out to enjoy what should have been a fun night. #heartbroken #stopthehate

    A post shared by Jason Aldean (@jasonaldean) on

    Country singer Jake Owen, who was on stage with Aldean, said children were among the crowd.
    “I saw kids on their parents’ shoulders tonight,” he said. “This is something they’ll never forget.”

    10 minutes of gunfire

    Rachel De Kerf filmed her escape, starting just after the first shots were fired.

      Concertgoer captures chaos among the crowd

    “The gunshots lasted for 10-15 minutes. It didn’t stop,” she said. “We just ran for our lives.”
    Her sister, Monique Dumas, said everyone dropped to the ground as as the gunman sprayed bullets.
    “It seemed there was a pause in the gunfire, and the people in the yellow shirts were telling the people to ‘go, go, go, go,’ ” she said. But “the gunfire never ended, it seemed like it went on and on and on.

    A concertgoer told CNN affiliate KLAS that frantic concertgoers piled on top of each other, trying to get out of the shooter’s line of fire.
    “My husband and I ran out toward our car, and there were people hiding underneath my car for cover,” she said.
    “There was a gentleman who was shot and he said, ‘Can you help me?’ And so I put him in my car, and I had like six people in my car — people without shoes, running, just to get away.”

    ‘Like shooting fish in a barrel’

    Audio of the shooting suggested that the shooter had used a military-style weapon, CNN law enforcement analyst James Gagliano said.

      Rapid-fire shots at Las Vegas concert

    “Automatic weapon(s) like that — had to be numbers of magazines or a very large drum,” he said.
    “It sounded to me like a belt-fed weapon, a military-style weapon. And then to be shooting down, to use the analogy, it was like shooting fish in a barrel in that space.”
    MGM Resorts, which owns the hotel the gunman fired from, tweeted its condolences.
    As local hospitals rushed to treat hundreds of patents, some relatives were still trying to find their loved ones.
    Those looking for friends and family still missing after the attack can call 866-535-5654. Facebook has set up a crisis response page to help people determine whether their loved ones are safe.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/02/us/las-vegas-shooter/index.html

    Fast-moving wildfires kill 10, spur evacuations in Northern California

    (CNN)Deadly wildfires roared across California on Monday, forcing evacuations and destroying homes and businesses in their paths. The biggest fires burned in the wine country of Napa and Sonoma counties.

    Here’s what we know so far, according to California authorities.
    • Ten people have died and the number is expected to grow.
      • More than 100 people were being treated at Napa- and Sonoma-area hospitals for fire-related injuries or health issues including burns, smoke inhalation and shortness of breath.
      • An estimated 1,500 structures have been destroyed and 57,000 acres burned in eight counties.
      • A wildfire in Anaheim, in Southern California, has spread to 4,000-5,000 acres and burned at least six buildings.
      More than 100 patients were treated at Napa and Sonoma area hospitals because of fire-related injuries and issues, said Vanessa DeGier, spokeswoman for St. Joseph Health. Santa Rosa Memorial also accepted 12 patients from the two nearby hospitals that evacuated, including expectant mothers, she said.
      “Our hospitals are beginning to see patients with injuries incurred as a result of evacuation. This includes victims of car crashes and injuries from falling,” a statement from St. Joseph Health said.
      Active wildfires in Northern California

      Source: CALFire as of 5 p.m. ET Monday, October 9

      Vineyards threatened

      Napa County is dealing with the biggest fires, Cal Fire said. The Tubbs and Atlas fires each cover about 25,000 acres. The Patrick fire west of Napa was at 3,000 acres.
      The Nuns fire in Sonoma County covers 5,000 acres, and firefighters also are battling a 1,500 acre fire at Highway 37 and Lakeville Highway in Sonoma.
      Alison Crowe, the winemaker for Garnet Vineyards & Picket Fence Vineyards in Napa Valley, said she has not been told to evacuate her home on the western edge of downtown Napa.
      “A quarter of my co-workers have been evacuated,” she said Monday. “I have friends fighting off fires with hoses in the hills. Thankfully a lot of my friends got out last night.”
      The main road through the area is still open but the aggressive nature of the blaze worries her.
      “It’s scary. We feel surrounded,” she said.
      Crowe estimated two-thirds to three-fourths of Napa’s grape harvest has taken place. The 2017 harvest will be remembered for this fire, she said.
      “Wine doesn’t matter, people matter,” she said. “I know that’s people’s attitude right now.”

      Perfect conditions for fires

      Authorities have not said what caused the fires, but noted that dry conditions made it easy for the fires to spread. October is typically the busiest month for wildfires in California, they said.
      Complicating firefighting efforts are low humidity and a lack of resources, Napa County Fire Chief Barry Biermann said.
      “As of right now, with these conditions, we can’t get in front of this fire and do anything about the forward progress,” he said, adding that resources from across California were to begin arriving in the area later Monday.
      Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday issued an emergency proclamation for Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties.
      “These fires have destroyed structures and continue to threaten thousands of homes, necessitating the evacuation of thousands of residents,” the governor’s emergency proclamation said. “These fires have damaged and continue to threaten critical infrastructure and have forced the closure of major highways and local roads.”
      The California National Guard has sent three medical evacuation helicopters, six firefighting helicopters and 100 military police personnel to assist local law enforcement.

      Winds expected to ease

      The fire spread smoke across the San Francisco Bay area and the Anaheim-area fire turned the sky red over Disneyland, according to a social media posting.
      Firefighters may get a break from the weather on Tuesday, mainly with decreasing winds.
      The National Weather Service in San Francisco on Sunday issued a “red flag warning” for the Bay Area because of current or impending critical fire weather conditions. The warning cited dry, “windy locations through the Napa Valley and northern Sonoma County valleys.” Gusts ranging from 35 mph to more than 60 mph were recorded.
      But “winds and the fire weather threat will decrease Tuesday in the north, but a threat will remain in Southern California,” the weather service said.
      Forecasters said the warning will likely remain in effect because of the warm and dry conditions and the presence of wildfires.

      Residents fleeing homes, hospitals

      Driving through these streets hoping that my friends and family’s houses survived is something that will change my heart forever. So much loss, memories smoldering, pain on people’s faces, everything gone in a second. To those who have suffered please do not hesitate to ask for help, I have faith that our city will unite and support those in need. Clothes, blankets, shoes, food, a place to shower or sleep, anything…reach out and we will extend our hands. #prayforsantarosa #prayforcalifornia #prayforourfuture #prayforourneighbors Song: Jason Walker-Shouldn’t be a good in goodbye

      A post shared by Rina Rose (@ninjanerd707) on

      Veronica Ortega was at the Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Santa Rosa when she smelled smoke and saw flames through the window of her fiancé’s room on the fourth floor.
      The two soon were loaded onto a city bus and shuttled away.
      Brian Alexander, a 34-year-old Santa Rosa resident, told CNN about stepping in to help his neighbors as the inferno surrounded his apartment complex.
      He drove four neighbors to nearby shelters. As they fled the flames one of them told him, “There’s no need to repent. Hell is already here.”
      “I couldn’t live with myself if someone died or couldn’t get help and I could have been there to stop it,” said Alexander, who packed what he could into his car, eyeing his apartment one final time amid the ash and smoke that burned his eyes and made breathing difficult.
      He later drove to Kaiser Permanente Hospital, where he works in environmental services, and began helping the hospital evacuate patients by moving gurney beds to the ambulances and city buses that were ferrying the patients to safety.
      “In a situation like this, it is really important that we be the best we can be,” he said. “There was no other option.”

      They watched home burn

      Alyssa O’Gorman and her family fled their home in the nick of time. As the flames closed in Sunday night, they left without a change of clothes. O’Gorman, her parents and her grandfather gathered their animals and were out of the house in minutes.
      O’Gorman, a nursing assistant, was driving home from her job when she first spotted flames.
      After evacuating the house, which sits at the dead end of a one-lane road in rural Napa County, she and her family watched from a distance as a propane tank exploded and their home’s roof caught fire.
      If O’Gorman hadn’t been coming home from work to wake her family, “we would have been in the house trapped,” she said.
      Along with Kaiser Permanente hospital, Sutter Hospital in Santa Rosa was also evacuated. Much of a mobile home park behind the Kaiser facility burned, CNN affiliate KPIX said.
      In Santa Rosa, the Fountain Grove Inn and Hotel was destroyed and another hotel, the Hilton, was in flames, the affiliate reported.

      Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/09/us/california-fires/index.html

      Portraits of the Las Vegas shooting victims

      (CNN)One was a man who died shielding his wife from gunfire on their wedding anniversary. Another was a city of Las Vegas employee who died in his boyfriend’s arms. And two others were a veteran corrections officer and his girlfriend who died on the trip they had planned for weeks.

      At least 58 people were killed and nearly 500 others were injured Sunday night, authorities say, when a gunman fired on an outdoor country musical festival from the 32nd floor of a Las Vegas hotel in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.
      Here are the victims’ stories:

        Andrea Castilla

        Andrea Castilla was holding hands with her sister, Athena, at the music festival when the gunfire erupted, according to a GoFundMe page set up by her family. She was shot in the head.
        Her boyfriend, Derek Miller, Athena and her fiancé, Shane Armstrong, carried Andrea out of the concert venue as bullets continued to rain down, according to the fundraising page. They stopped a passing truck to take her to a hospital, where she died.
        “Her beautiful soul will live on forever,” her father, Gus, wrote on Facebook. “I will think of her every day. … I feel Andrea is now an angel in heaven.”
        In another post, her father added, “I will cry my self to sleep… Daddy misses you.”
        Castilla worked at Sephora in Huntington Beach, California. A company statement said she was “known to her colleagues … for her vibrancy, liveliness, caring and consideration of others.”

        Carrie Parsons

        Carrie Parsons, 31, was “always the life of the party and had the biggest heart,” her aunt Barbara wrote on Facebook.
        “We lost our beautiful niece to a totally senseless act in Las Vegas,” Barbara Parsons wrote. “There really are no words to describe the pain of missing Carrie on our whole family. … Recently engaged, she had her whole life in front of her.”
        A Seattle-area resident, Parsons was at the Las Vegas music festival on a trip with her girlfriends, CNN affiliate KOMO reported.
        “She would always say, ‘live, laugh, love’ and she did that,” her friend Laura Cooper told KOMO.
        Parsons, a lover of country music, had a “vibrant, bubbly personality,” her friend Robbie Walden told CNN affiliate KCPQ.

        Austin Meyer

        Austin Meyer, a Marina, California, resident, was at the concert with his fiancée Dana Getreu to celebrate his 24th birthday, according to CNN affiliate KSBW. They were also celebrating an upcoming anniversary.
        Meyer had recently moved to Reno, Nevada, where he was an automotive student at Truckee Meadows Community College, the school said in a statement.
        “He was a wonderful young man and my future son-in-law,” Getreu’s father, Gary, said in the statement posted on the college’s Facebook page.
        “He loved attending the automotive program at your school and praised it all the time. … The loss and grief his family and mine feel at this time is beyond belief.”
        Mayer hoped to open his own auto repair shop after graduation, according to his sister, Veronica Meyer.
        “He was excited to get married and start a family,” she told KSBW.
        She described her brother as “ambitious, smart, and hard-working,” and said he “always had a smile on his face.”

        Brett Schwanbeck

        Brett Schwanbeck, 61, attended the music festival with his fiancée, Anna Orozco, who survived and told his family he had been fatally shot, according to his niece, Carla Van Hoosen.
        “Brett was a great man that was funny, generous, kind, loving and so full of joy,” Van Hoosen wrote on a GoFundMe page she started for his family’s expenses.
        “He would drive 500 miles to help you if you needed it. He loved his family dearly and cherished lake trips, family gatherings, hunting, camping and spending time with his kids and grandkids.”
        The Bullhead City, Arizona, resident died from his injuries Tuesday at Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center in Las Vegas. The retired truck driver is survived by five siblings, three children and five grandchildren.

        Teresa Nicol Kimura

        Teresa Nicol Kimura, known as Nicol, was at the concert with six friends, said Ryan Miller, pastor at For His Glory Community Church in Fullerton, California.
        Miller was among those friends. He said they all scattered when the shooting started. After the rest of the group reconnected, the friends learned Kimura had died.
        Kimura, 38, of Placentia, California, worked for the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration in Irvine.
        “Nicol’s heart was bigger than most human beings, her spirit was beautiful, her laugh was infectious, and she just had a way of making every time we gathered an awesome one,” Miller wrote on a GoFundMe page he started for her family. “She made you jealous of how much she loved life. And if you didn’t know her, you missed out on a better life than the one you have.”
        Responding to the news, the press office of California Gov. Jerry Brown wrote on Twitter, “Sad to learn @cdtfa employee Teresa Nicol Kimura was a victim of the Las Vegas shooting. We send sincere condolences to family & coworkers.”

        Keri Lynn Galvan

        Keri Lynn Galvan, 31, lived in Thousand Oaks, California. The mother of three was a server at Mastro’s Steakhouse.
        “Her days started and ended with doing everything in her power to be a wonderful mother,” her sister Lindsey Poole wrote on a GoFundMe page created for the family. “She was senselessly murdered on October 1st, 2017 while enjoying a night out with her husband and friends.”
        Tilman Fertitta, chairman and CEO of Landry’s Inc., Mastro’s parent company, said the company is deeply saddened by Galvan’s death.
        “Keri was with our Mastro’s family for almost 10 years and was a valued member of our team,” Fertitta said. “Our condolences go out to her family and all those who knew and cared for Keri. We are raising funds internally to help support her family during this difficult time.”

        Rocio Guillen Rocha

        Rocio Guillen Rocha and her fiancé were in Las Vegas to celebrate a friend’s birthday, and the couple were at the concert when she was shot.
        She was taken to a hospital but didn’t survive, her family said.
        A resident of Anaheim, California, she leaves behind four children, including a son born just weeks ago.
        She was an assistant manager at a California Pizza Kitchen restaurant — and she once struggled through what was once feared to be permanent paralysis, said her eldest son, Marcus Guillen, 18.
        “She was paralyzed having my brother” years ago, Guillen told CNN. “She had a blood clot in her spine. The doctors said she would never walk again. She proved everyone wrong. She was able walk. After that, she ran half marathons.
        “She did everything she could. She always fought for us. I want (people) to remember just how much a fighter she was and how much she worked and how much she provided for us.”
        She is survived by her fiancé, Chris Jaksha, and her children: Marcus; Christopher, 13; Sofia, 1; and a 1-month-old, Austin.

        Patricia ‘Pati’ Mestas

        Patricia “Pati” Mestas, 67, attended the festival with some friends and was near the front of the stage when the shooting began, her cousin Tom Smith said.
        Mestas was a retired gas station, convenience store and deli manager from Menifee, California, and she loved country music, traveling and her family, Smith said.
        “This was the best part of her life,” Smith said, adding she talked of having time now to be with her grandchildren. “I remember the almost constant laughter.”
        Smith recalls spending time with Mestas in March after their last remaining uncle died. He sat next to her at dinner. “It was difficult for life to defeat her,” he said. “I remember her being able to talk about the good things, rather than talk about illnesses, like older people do. She loved to laugh, loved to smile — a big smile that would line up the whole of her face.”
        Mestas leaves two brothers, three children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

        Brian Fraser

        Brian Fraser of La Palma, California, attended the festival with about 20 people that included his wife and children. Nick Arellano, the oldest of Fraser’s four children, described him as “the most involved parent.”
        He coached his children’s football and baseball teams and was in the school parents’ association. Arellano was 11 when Fraser married his mother and adopted him. The couple had three other children, who are ages 17, 10 and 4. “He took care of all (of) us,” Arellano said. “Every person he was in contact with saw his love and compassion and honesty.”
        Jason Aldean, the last act of Route 91 Harvest, was Fraser’s favorite country singer. Fraser and his wife were walking toward the stage for his favorite Aldean song, “Dirt Road Anthem” when he was shot, Arellano said. A friend performed CPR on Fraser and loaded him into a wheel barrow to seek medical attention. Doctors and nurses did everything they could, but Fraser died of his injuries. “We don’t know who they are, but we want to thank them,” Arellano said.
        Fraser was vice president of sales at Greenpath Funding. The company released a statement after his death: “Brian Fraser impacted everyone who crossed his path with his infectious positive energy, his tenacious will to succeed, and his willingness to help others.
        “Our hearts are broken, and the Greenpath family will never forget you, Brian.”

        Denise Cohen

        Denise Cohen of Carpinteria, California, was a property manager in Santa Barbara with two children. She attended the concert with her companion, Derrick “Bo” Taylor.
        The couple had been planning the trip for weeks, her friend Leana Orsua told CNN affiliate KEYT. Cohen was planning to volunteer at the California Avocado Festival the following weekend.
        “She was a very active, social person. She touched so many lives. She was a super positive, genuine, kindhearted individual,” Orsua said.
        She said Cohen and Taylor met at a social gathering and quickly became friends, then roommates. Orsua shared a text message with KETY from Cohen’s son, Jeff Rees, remembering his mother.
        “Our mother was such a strong, beautiful and happy woman who made a difference to the lives of everyone she knew,” he wrote. “She was such a happy person and enjoyed doing the things in life that she loved. We can see by the last photo of her that she was indeed happy and with a person that loves her, Bo.”

        Derrick ‘Bo’ Taylor

        Derrick “Bo” Taylor, 56, was a veteran with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
        Taylor joined the department about 30 years ago, rising to the rank of lieutenant. He worked at the Ventura Conservation Camp, which houses up to 110 adult male inmates. The camp helps train inmates to become regional firefighters.
        He attended the concert with his girlfriend, Denise Cohen.
        Taylor’s loss will be felt deeply, Warden Joel Martinez wrote in a memo to staff, according to a department newsletter.
        “There are no words to express the feeling of loss and sadness regarding Bo’s passing. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends,” Martinez wrote.
        In the comments section of the notice on his death, people praised Taylor as a good co-worker and friend. As one person said, “Bo was a great man, as a supervisor he set the bar so high that no one will ever be able to touch it.”

        Kurt von Tillow

        Kurt von Tillow of Cameron Park, California, and his wife Mary Jo were best friends who did everything together. They golfed together and recently brought their two grandchildren to Disneyland. Together, they attended the country musical festival with their daughter and two more relatives.
        Von Tillow’s wife and daughter escaped unharmed. But the 55-year-old truck driver died of his injuries, a relative told CNN. Von Tillow’s sister and niece were hospitalized Monday and are expected to survive, Janet Carson-Tenney said.
        “He lived a perfect life. He was loved by everybody, he didn’t have an enemy, he didn’t have a mean bone in his body. He was the life of the party,” Carson-Tenney told CNN. She’ll remember his laugh and how much he loved his family.

        Jack Beaton

        Jack Beaton of Bakersfield, California, and his wife Laurie were celebrating their 23rd wedding anniversary with friends at the concert.
        He was shot while shielding his wife from the gunfire, CNN affiliate KBAK reported.
        “He never passed up an opportunity to give somebody a hand,” Beaton’s father-in-law Jerry Cook told KBAK. “He always had a smile on his face. He had countless friends. Everybody that came in contact with him loved the guy.”
        Three hours before the shooting, he posted a blurry photo on Facebook of the gang lounging on the lawn, koozie-covered beers in hand.
        The day after the shooting, Beaton’s son shared a picture on Twitter of his father and asked for prayers.
        “He jumped in front of my mom and got shot,” he wrote. “I love you dad.”
        Later, he posted on Facebook: “Lost my best friend. I love you so much more (than) you could ever imagine.”

        John Phippen

        John Phippen, a 56-year-old father of six, was fatally shot while shielding a woman from the gunfire, Phippen’s neighbor said.
        Phippen was hit after his son stopped to help someone else, said Leah Nagyivanyi, Phippen’s neighbor and close friend for 17 years. His son was wounded in the arm, she said.
        Phippen lost his wife three years ago, said Nagyivanyi. Her family went on camping trips with Phippen and his clan. He was the kind of person who got along with both children and adults, she said.
        “Our kids look up to us, and look to us for guidance, but these kids considered John their best friend,” Nagyivani said. “That tells a lot about the kind of person you are. He was everybody’s best friend.”
        One time, when a boat flipped over during a camping trip, Phippen and his son sprang into action just like they did at the concert, she said.
        “He was a man of integrity who always had your back,” she said. “There is nothing he couldn’t do for you, wouldn’t do for you. You didn’t even have to ask.”

        Thomas Day Jr.

        Thomas Day Jr., 54, of Riverside, California, was with his four children at the festival, said Bruce Abbey, a vice president of a California construction company where Day worked.
        His daughter Whitney Day wrote the following about her father:
        “My sisters Candice and Kelsey and brother Nolan and I just want to say that he was our rock, he was our everything. Anyone he came across he put a smile on their face. All our friends would call him Daddy Day because he treated everyone like one of his own and it was an honor to us all to be able to share our dad with the world.”
        Day was an estimator at Portrait Construction in Corona, California, and had been at the company for more than 20 years, Abbey said.

        Austin Davis

        Austin Davis, a pipefitter from Riverside, California, was at the concert with a friend and her family. The friend’s father, Tom Day Jr., was also killed.
        His girlfriend of nine years, Aubree Hennigan, said he loved playing softball. Katelyn Hood, who said Davis was her best friend and her baby’s godfather, described him as a man’s man with a contagious smile.
        “He worked so very hard and took the most pride in that and anything he did. Austin didn’t half-a** anything in life. If he knew you, he loved you. That’s just how he cared for people,” Hood said.
        Davis’ mother, Lori Quick, said he was her everything. In his last text to her, he said, “I kinda want to come home, I love home,” Quick said in a Facebook post.
        “He is coming home not in a way that any parent would want him to. We wanted to bring him home in our arms,” she said.

        Chris Hazencomb

        Chris Hazencomb, 44, was excited to see one of his favorite artists, Jason Aldean, at Route 91 Harvest.
        Hazencomb went to the festival with his friend Nikki Torres. Torres said she and her husband knew Hazencomb for years and considered him part of their family.
        “He was the nicest person I have known. He loved to help people and thought of others before himself,” she told CNN.
        Like many attendees, they thought the first round of gunshots were firecrackers. “After the second or third rounds, we realized that it was bad,” Torres said. “That is when I looked over and he was on the ground.”
        After that, Torres said her memories blur together. She saw a man try to help Hazencomb while others led her away from the scene.
        Hazencomb’s mother told the Ventura County Star that he was a sports a junkie who worked at the Walmart Neighborhood Market in Camarillo, California.

        Laura Shipp

        Laura Shipp, 50, spent two days at the festival with her son, Corey. They were “big concertgoers, especially when it came to country,” a family friend said in an online fund-raiser.
        At some point during the shooting, the two became separated, and Corey Shipp spent the day afterward looking for his mother. By Wednesday, she had been identified, her brother told CNN.
        Shipp, an avid Dodgers fan, moved to Las Vegas about five years ago to be closer to her son, the Ventura County Star reported.
        “She was his world and he was hers,” her brother Steve Shipp told the newspaper.
        Aimee Mack, one of Shipp’s friends, told CNN that they’d been close since they met in the ninth grade, and that Shipp was generous and “was smart as a whip and had a huge heart.”
        “Laura made friends with everyone,” Mack said.

        Victor Link

        Victor Link of Aliso Viejo, California, described himself on his company’s website as a “tequila quality control tester.” He also enjoyed traveling, snowboarding, golfing, cooking and wine tasting with family and friends.
        Andrew Soss said that Link worked for his mortgage originator business.
        “He was the most genuine, stand-up guy you’ll ever meet. He brought a smile to everyone’s face,” Soss said.
        Link was attending the concert with his fiancée and their friends.
        “They came back from a two-week trip from Europe a month ago, and they were traveling and living life,” his nephew Vincent Link told The Bakersfield Californian.

        Christiana Duarte

        Christiana Duarte had recently started working for the Los Angeles Kings after graduating from the University of Arizona in May with a degree in mass communications. The NHL team put out a call for information about her Sunday night.
        “Our organization is overwhelmed with grief over the loss of our colleague Chrissy,” Kings President Luc Robitaille said in a statement. “In just a brief period of time, Chrissy had an immeasurable impact on all of us. We want to make every effort to ensure that everyone knows how special she was and the impact she already had made on so many people.
        She had worked with the Los Angeles Rams as well as the Arizona Diamondbacks. She enjoyed playing intramural soccer, softball and volleyball.
        Her alma mater confirmed her death. The school said it is reaching out to those who knew her, including her Sigma Kappa sorority sisters.
        “All of us in the University of Arizona community are saddened that Christiana Duarte, one of our graduates from this past May, is among the victims from Las Vegas on Sunday night,” President Robert C. Robbins said in a statement. “This attack is a terrible tragedy for hundreds of families, and it is a shocking and horrific event for all of us. I know I speak for the UA community in expressing our deepest condolences to Christiana’s family and in asking for their privacy to be respected.”

        Carly Kreibaum

        Carly Kreibaum’s passion for art lives on in a Sutherland, Iowa, flower shop, where she painted flowers on the storefront. Florist Bonnie Wallinga, owner of The Menagerie, told CNN affiliate KTIV that the married mother of two didn’t have a mean bone in her body.
        Kreibaum’s sister-in-law confirmed that she was among the victims of the mass shooting.

        Brennan Lee Stewart

        Las Vegas native Brennan Lee Stewart shielded his girlfriend and helped others to safety before he was shot dead, his family said in a statement.
        “Brennan was the kind of guy who always put others before himself, including up to the moment he lost his life,” the family said.
        Stewart loved country music, played the guitar and wrote music, his family said.
        Last year he posted to Facebook his cover of the Cole Swindell song “You Should Be Here.” As of Wednesday, the post received more than 134,000 views and more than 1,170 shares.
        “His love for country music was shown through the songs that he wrote, and the music he played on his guitar. Brennan rarely missed an opportunity to attend a country concert,” his family said.

        Dana Gardner

        Dana Gardner of Grand Terrace, California, was the deputy recorder of the San Bernardino County assessor-recorder-clerk’s office.
        “We are devastated and still in shock trying to comprehend what happened last (Sunday) night,” her daughter Kayla Gardner posted to Facebook on Monday. “My family and I appreciate the outpouring of love and support and ask for prayers at this time.”
        Dana Gardner was a county employee for more than two decades and was known for her “can-do” attitude and vibrant energy, said Bob Dutton, San Bernardino County’s assessor-recorder-clerk.
        “Dana will be dearly missed by family, friends, and co-workers. San Bernardino County mourns her loss. We offer our deepest condolences to Dana’s loved ones and to all those impacted by this horrific event,” Dutton said.
        “Our mom was an amazing human being and she stood for everything good in the world,” Gardner’s daughter, Kayla, told CNN. “She had a contagious smile that would light up a room and a sense of humor that would make everyone laugh.”
        “She instilled in us the importance of love and caring for human beings, and was a person with no hate who saw people for their character and always saw the good in them,” she said.

        Cameron Robinson

        Cameron
        Cameron Robinson lived in southwestern Utah but commuted to Las Vegas, where he worked as a legal records specialist, said his sister, Meghan Ervin.
        He was at the concert with his boyfriend, Ervin told CNN affiliate KUTV.

        Dorene Anderson

        Dorene Anderson, 49, of Alaska, was at the concert with her daughters, CNN affiliate KTUU in Anchorage reported.
        The Alaska Housing Finance Corp., which employs her husband, John, confirmed her death.
        Dorene Anderson’s family released this statement through the employer:
        “Due to this horrific and terrible situation, our family is dealing with a great loss. She (Dorene) was the most amazing wife, mother and person this world ever had. We are so grateful and lucky for the time that we did have with her. We are greatly appreciative and want to thank everyone for the thoughts and prayers you have been sending us. We are dealing with the situation as a family, and would appreciate our privacy as we grieve for our loss.”

        Lisa Patterson

        Lisa Patterson, from Los Angeles’ San Pedro community, was a mother of three. She was attending the concert with four friends.
        Patterson was active in church, helped coach in a girls’ softball league and was devoted to her family, said her husband, Robert Patterson.
        After hearing about the shooting, he drove to Las Vegas with his son and eldest daughter on Monday morning but couldn’t immediately find out what happened to his wife.
        A coroner called him Monday evening to tell him she’d passed away. He returned to Los Angeles, where he broke the news of her death to their youngest daughter, who’s 8.
        “I can’t believe she’s gone. … She was such a warm, caring person. There was nobody that cared more about people and life than my wife, Lisa,” Robert Patterson told CNN affiliate KCBS.
        “She was such an amazing person. She cared for so many people,” her eldest daughter, Amber Patterson, told CNN. “She was so enthusiastic. She was literally the best mom, and she was my best friend.”
        Amber said she appreciated hearing people’s fond memories of her mother.
        “When I got my belly button pierced and her going with me … that kind of stuff really is what makes me think of her and makes me happy to remember her,” she said.

        Steve Berger

        Steve Berger of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, was killed in Sunday’s attack, his father told CNN affiliate WTMJ.
        He was celebrating his 44th birthday with friends in Las Vegas, the TV station reported.
        Berger moved to Minnesota about 10 years ago and was a financial adviser for EFS Advisors.
        “Steve was passionate about his work as a financial adviser, and was beloved by his clients,” the company said in a statement. “He cared so much for others and was always willing to take time to listen to clients, friends, and co-workers to offer a helping hand.”
        The father of three children was able to run a successful financial planning business, get his kids to school in the morning and off to soccer practice in the evening, his father, Richard Berger, told CNN affiliate WCCO.
        “He was the greatest father for his three kids that you’d ever want,” the elder Berger told the TV station.

        Bill Wolfe Jr.

        Bill Wolfe Jr. was a youth wrestling coach in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania.
        “It is with the most of broken hearts, the families of Bill Wolfe Jr. and his wife, Robyn, share that Bill has been confirmed to be among the deceased as a result of the mass attack in Las Vegas,” the Shippensburg Police Department said on Facebook.
        Carl Bert, owner of a surveying and engineering firm, told CNN affiliate WPVI that Wolfe had once worked for him as an engineer. Bert described him as personable, fun, easy to work with and a devoted Christian, WPVI reported.

        Jordyn Rivera

        Jordyn Rivera was in her fourth year at California State University, San Bernardino. The university released a statement confirming her death.
        “It is with the utmost sadness I must report that a member of our campus community is among the victims,” university President Tomás Morales said.
        Rivera was warm, optimistic and kind, he said.
        Katie Ortega, who has known Rivera for years, said they played softball together as kids.
        Rivera “was and always will be a role model to many,” Ortega said. “She would always make it a point to make every single individual feel special, always laughing at my stupid jokes.”
        She was passionate about softball.
        “That softball diamond was her heaven,” Ortega said.

        Heather Warino Alvarado

        Heather Alvarado, 35, was a mother of three and married to Albert Alvarado, a firefighter in Cedar City, Utah. The couple loved traveling with their three children.
        “She always saw the good in others. She spent her whole life serving others in her family and community,” the Cedar City Fire Department said in a Facebook post.
        “She was happiest when she was together with her family, especially her children and she would do anything for them.”
        “They appreciate your many words of kindness and concern,” the post said.

        Candice Bowers

        Candice Bowers was a single mother of three. Her family described her as a superhero who loved country music.
        “It was a gift that she was able to spend her final moments doing what she loved with those she loved even more,” her family said.
        “Her strength, fierce loyalty and memory will live on through their lives and those of her family and friends who loved her so dearly.”
        Her children included a recently adopted 2-year-old, her family said in a statement.

        Adrian Murfitt

        Adrian Murfitt, 35, was a commercial fisherman from Alaska.
        Murfitt had surprised his friend with a weekend trip to Las Vegas when the shooting happened. His friend Brian MacKinnon held him in his lap as he passed away from gunshot wounds.
        His mother, Avonna Murfitt, told CNN that her son was jolly and caring.
        ʺEvery one of his friends was his best friend,ʺ she said. ʺHe will be missed by all who knew him, and most of all by me.ʺ
        The outpouring of love has been amazing, Avonna Murfitt said.
        “We are humbled by the way everyone who knew him has offered assistance to help in bringing him home and celebrating his life,” she said.

        Kelsey Meadows

        Kelsey Meadows, 28, was a substitute teacher in California’s Taft Union High School District.
        Meadows graduated from Taft Union High School in 2007 and later earned a bachelor’s degree from Fresno State University. She returned to the Taft community, where she had worked as a regular substitute teacher with the district since 2012, the district said in a statement.
        Taft Union High School Principal Mary Alice Finn said Meadows was “smart, compassionate and kind.”
        “She had a sweet spirit and a love for children,” Finn said. “Words cannot adequately capture the sorrow felt by her students, colleagues and friends in learning of her passing.”

        Melissa Ramirez

        Melissa Ramirez graduated from California State University Bakersfield in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.
        Flags at the school were lowered on Monday in honor of Ramirez and the other victims and will remain so through sunset on Friday, the school said in a statement.
        “We are terribly saddened to learn that we lost a member of our CSUB family in this senseless act of violence. Our entire CSUB campus community is heartbroken, and we send our deepest sympathies to Melissa Ramirez’s family and friends,” the school said.

        Rachael Parker

        Rachael Parker was a 33-year-old records technician for the police department in Manhattan Beach, California. She also had eyes on higher education.
        Parker earned her bachelor’s degree in social work from Colorado State University in June 2016, Manhattan Beach Police Department said. She was in the process of applying to graduate school, police said.
        She worked for nearly a decade at the front desk of the police station. Even in those stressful confines, she was known for her “cheerful and compassionate demeanor,” police said.
        “Rachael’s smile could light up a room, even on the most difficult of days.”
        She had a particular passion for working with older adults. She completed her undergraduate practicum by working with Manhattan Beach’s Older Adults Program.
        She loved her two adopted dogs, Maddie and Izzy. She enjoyed baking, country music and Los Angeles Kings hockey, police said.
        “Rachael, we love you and we miss you. Our hearts are breaking,” police wrote. “Please keep Rachael’s family and friends in your thoughts during this difficult time.”
        She was one of four off-duty Manhattan Beach police employees who attended the Vegas concert. She died at the hospital. Another police employee, a sworn officer, was shot and suffered minor injuries, the department said.

        Jordan McIldoon

        Jordan McIldoon, a 25-year-old from Maple Ridge, British Columbia, died holding the hand of a stranger at the concert.
        Heather Gooze told CNN she somehow ended up next to McIldoon. Even though she didn’t know him, she held his hand during his final minutes. She felt a squeeze from his fingers, then felt his hand go loose.
        Gooze said she knew there was nothing more to do. Yet, she stayed with McIldoon for hours. When his phone rang, she answered it and learned his name and told the caller everything was not OK.
        She relayed the news of his death to his long-term girlfriend and his mother, all the while staying by his side, she said.
        “I didn’t want Jordan to not have somebody with him,” she told CNN through tears. “I didn’t want him to just be a no-named body. I knew who he was, and now I had an obligation to make sure that everyone knew who he was.”
        McIldoon’s mother told Gooze he was a good, nice and fun person.
        “He loved his girlfriend and had great family and great friends,” Gooze told CNN.

        Christopher Roybal

        Christopher Roybal, 28, was a general manager at a Crunch gym in North Colorado Springs, Colorado. He was known there for his “big teddy bear smile and infectious laughter,” said David Harman, managing partner at Crunch.
        “More than a team member, we lost someone who was a son, mentor, friend and hero, as a Navy veteran who served in Afghanistan,” Harman said.
        Ryan Chiaverini, Roybal’s former brother-in-law, told CNN that Roybal was attending the concert with his mother to celebrate his 29th birthday. He had a really good sense of humor and had a “fun, sweet, innocent way about him,” Chiaverini said.
        In a Facebook post from July, Roybal poignantly reflected on what it’s like being shot at from his time overseas.
        “My response has always been the same, not one filled with a sense of pride or ego, but an answer filled with truth and genuine fear/anger,” he wrote.
        He said his first fight was something he’d never forget. He felt sensory overload and extreme adrenaline, making him “excited, angry and manic.” But as the fights continued, the excitement faded, leaving just the anger, he wrote.
        “What’s it like to be shot at? It’s a nightmare no amount of drugs, no amount of therapy and no amount of drunk talks with your war veteran buddies will ever be able to escape,” he wrote. “Cheers boys.”

        Hannah Ahlers

        Brian Ahlers told CNN his wife of 17 years was “shot in the head while dancing” with him at the music festival.
        Hannah Ahlers, 34, was a stay-at-home mom of three who had lived in Beaumont, California, for the last five years, but was originally from Redlands.
        “She was a full-time house wife and mommy and she was amazing at it,” he said. “Very active in moms groups and our daughter’s volleyball team. She wasn’t too good for anybody. Beautiful inside and out.”
        Ryan Chiaverini, who was friends with Ahlers, told CNN that “she couldn’t hurt a fly.”
        “She was one of the kindest people I’ve met,” he said.

        Stacee Etcheber

        Stacee
        The San Francisco Police Officers Association confirmed Tuesday that Stacee Etcheber was killed in the attack.
        Etcheber attended the concert with her husband, Vinnie Etcheber, a San Francisco police officer who was off-duty. When the shooting began, Vinnie Etcheber told his wife to run as he began to render aid to those wounded, the police union said in a statement.
        “With heavy hearts, we’ve learned that Stacee Etcheber has passed away. Stacee was a wonderful, caring wife, mother, and daughter. She will be terribly missed,” union President Martin Halloran said in a statement.
        “Our deepest condolences go out to the entire Etcheber family and our thoughts and prayers are with all those who lost a loved one during this tragic attack.”

        Denise Salmon Burditus

        Denise Salmon Burditus, 50, was a retired banking professional who had just returned to college.She was the former president of the Association of the US Army subchapter in Lacey, Washington, according to NorthwestMilitary.com.
        She and her husband, Tony, were in Las Vegas enjoying a weekend away from their West Virginia home.
        The couple, who were married for 32 years, posted pictures on social media of themselves lounging by the pool and having dinner with friends. About 30 minutes before the shooting, Denise Burditus posted a picture of the two standing in front of the Route 91 Harvest stage.
        The couple were dancing together when the gunfire started and continued through the first burst of gunfire, not sure what it was. During the second burst, Tony Burditus said he was leading his wife through the crowd when a bullet hit her.
        A stranger helped him move her, and someone rode with them to a hospital in the back of a truck. Tony Burditus said his wife died in his arms.
        “It saddens me to say that I lost my wife of 32 years, a mother of two, soon to be grandmother of 5 this evening in the Las Vegas Shooting,” he wrote on Facebook. “Denise passed in my arms. I LOVE YOU BABE.”

        Charleston Hartfield

        Charleston Hartfield was many things: a Las Vegas police officer, an accomplished Nevada Army National Guard sergeant first class and a youth football coach.
        But beyond those titles, he “epitomizes everything good about America,” said Brig. Gen. Zachary Doser, commander of the Nevada National Guard.
        Hartfield was off-duty and attending the Route 91 Harvest concert when he was shot and killed, the Guard said in a statement.
        Though just 34, Hartfield wrote a memoir titled “Memoirs of a Public Servant,” which documented the “thoughts, feelings, and interactions of one Police Officer in the busiest and brightest city in the world, Las Vegas.”
        “Charleston Hartfield lived to serve the public and protect his family,” Brig. Gen. William Burks, the adjutant general of the Nevada National Guard, said. “He is the epitome of a citizen-soldier.”
        Hartfield — or “Coach Chucky,” as some called him — was also a coach for the Henderson Cowboys youth football program, the group said on Facebook.
        “Coach Hartfield touched many lives both on and off the field. He was a great man who we all lost way (too) early,” the program said.
        Stan King, the father of one of the players on the team, said he was “an absolute all-American kind of guy.”
        “He is one of the nicest guys I know and helped countless youth become winners through NYS football here in Henderson, Nevada,” King said. “This kind of guy comes around once in a blue moon. He was a very special guy to the community.”

        Angela Gomez

        Angela “Angie” Gomez was a “fun-loving, sweet young lady with a great sense of humor” who loved the stage, the Riverside Unified School District said in a statement.
        Gomez attended Riverside Polytechnic High School in California and was a member of the class of 2015. She acted on stage with the Riverside Children’s Theater, was involved in the middle and high school choir, and was a cheerleader for the high school, the school district said.
        She challenged herself academically with honors and Advanced Placement courses, the school district said. And she “was always seen with a smile on her face whenever she was on campus.”
        “Angie was a loyal friend who loved her family and will be forever missed by all those who knew her,” the district said.
        Her English teacher and cheer coach Lupe Avila said the school was “deeply saddened by the loss of a wonderful young woman who had her whole life ahead of her.”

        Sonny Melton

        Sonny Melton, 29, a registered nurse from Tennessee, was shot and killed in the attack Sunday night, according to the Henry County Medical Center in Paris, Tennessee, where he worked.
        His wife, Heather Melton, an orthopedic surgeon at Innovative Orthopedics, survived the mass shooting, the statement reads.

        Nothing stood out about Stephen Paddock before Las Vegas shooting, people who knew him say

        (CNN)The last time Eric Paddock heard from his brother, Stephen Paddock had texted to find out how their 90-year-old mother was doing.

        About two weeks after the text, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock would be dead of a self-inflicted gun shot after police say he opened fire on a country music festival in Las Vegas.
        The news doesn’t square with Eric Paddock’s image of his older brother, he told reporters Monday — a poker-playing accountant with no apparent political or religious affiliation, “as far as I know,” he hastened to add.
          To his brother, Stephen was “just a guy,” an “army of one” with no known children despite a string of relationships. Someone you might see nursing a drink alone at a bar. Someone who went on cruises and played $100-a-hand video poker. Someone who sent boxes of cookies to his mother.
          “There’s absolutely no way I could conceive that my brother would shoot a bunch of people that he didn’t know,” Eric Paddock said outside his home Monday, shaking his head as he fumbled for words.
          “Something just incredibly wrong happened to my brother.”

            Brother: Shooter had no political associations

          Various agencies are investigating what led Stephen Paddock to shoot from the 32th floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel into a crowd of some 22,000 concertgoers. Paddock killed more than 50 people and wounded more than 500.
          Las Vegas police said they did not know Stephen Paddock’s name before the shooting and they believe he acted alone. He bought multiple firearms in the past, but investigators believe the firearms were purchased legally, a law enforcement official said. A Mesquite store, Guns & Guitars, said it sold a gun to Paddock and that “he never gave any indication or reason to believe he was unstable or unfit at any time.”
          Police found at least 23 weapons inside his hotel room, including multiple rifles, some with scopes. At least one rifle may have been altered to function as an automatic weapon, a law enforcement official said.
          Eric Paddock said he knew his brother had firearms. His children had gone skeet-shooting with their uncle before, but Eric did not know Stephen to be a hunter. He acknowledged the limits of his knowledge, living thousands of miles from a brother he only spoke to occasionally.
          Eric helped his brother drive across the country in 2016 to a new home in Mesquite, Nevada, a retiree community about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. Along the way, the brothers ate sushi and drank late into the evening, Eric Paddock recalled. But he did not recall his brother bringing a machine gun along with him.
          Stephen Paddock lived in Mesquite with his girlfriend, Marilou Danley, police said. She was out of the country during the shooting, and is not believed to have been involved.

            Eyewitness: ‘people were just screaming’

          A search of Stephen Paddock’s home turned up at least 19 additional firearms, explosives and several thousand rounds of ammunition, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said Monday night. Several pounds of ammonium nitrate, a material used to make explosives, were found in Paddock’s car.
          That came as a surprise to one of his former neighbors. “If there was any impression, I would say, guy had no idea what a gun was,” said Don Judy, who lived next door to Stephen Paddock from 2013-2015 in a retirement community in Melbourne, Florida.
          Paddock never stayed at the house for very long, Judy said. Sometimes he came with his girlfriend, sometimes without.
          “He was a gambler and a speculator, and he did that in Vegas,” Judy said. Paddock once mentioned that “We’re up all night because we gamble,” the neighbor added.
          Eric Paddock said his brother was a successful real estate investor who owned apartments and houses. Investigators were looking Monday at several properties in the Reno area associated with Stephen Paddock.
          Residents of the properties told CNN the FBI stopped by on Monday. One resident at the Del Webb Parkway said he and his wife never saw Stephen Paddock, but saw his girlfriend as recently as this summer.

          Because he had no children, he was free to come and go as he pleased, his brother said. Paddock had married and divorced twice, court records show. His first marriage lasted two years, from 1977 to 1979. He remarried in 1985, and divorced again in 1990, after four years of marriage.
          His second ex-wife lives in Los Angeles County, California, and has had no contact with him in years, authorities said.
          He flew planes for a while until he got tired of it and started taking cruises, his brother said. A federal official confirmed he had a pilot’s license, but said that he was not up to date on the medical certification he would need in order to fly legally.
          It was a passion that traced back to his childhood, his brother said. He excelled at sports, too, but never played or joined organized clubs. “He wasn’t a team kind of guy,” Eric Paddock said.
          One point of intrigue has emerged from the shooter’s background, courtesy of his brother: Their father was a bank robber.
          According to the FBI, Benjamin Hoskins Paddock was on its most-wanted list from June 10, 1969 until May 5, 1977. He escaped from prison in 1969 and lived on the run until 1978, when he was arrested in Oregon, the Eugene Register-Guard reported at the time. Eric Paddock said his father died a few years ago and that “he was never with my mom.” Eric said he was born while his father was on the run.
          But Eric Paddock resisted the idea that his brother was somehow emulating their father’s criminal tendencies. When pressed to explain what happened, he has no explanation.
          “He was my brother, and it’s like an asteroid fell out of the sky,” he said. “We’re still just completely dumbstruck.”
          Correction: This story has been revised to give the correct full name of the Eugene Register-Guard. The story also has been revised to give the correct amount of time Stephen Paddock and his ex-wife were married. They were married for four years and nine months.

          Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/02/us/las-vegas-attack-stephen-paddock-trnd/index.html

          Fire destroyed their home during Harvey. But a Virgin Mary statue survived

          (CNN)It wasn’t just wind and rain that caused damage when Hurricane Harvey blasted through the Texas coast. Fires did their share too.

          But they also found something in the ashes that they say gave them hope — an intact statue of the Virgin Mary.
          “Some may blame God and some may blame the hurricane but the only thing standing were holy things,” Natali Rojas told CNN affiliate KRIS. “As you can see this statue is the only thing that survived. I dug in there for things and all I found is a Virgin Mary.”
            The family said the Robstown Fire Department battled the flames even as the hurricane raged.
            “I wanna thank the Fire Department of Robstown for courage to show up in the storm while the tremendous power, the wind, the rain were going and they were still out here trying their best. It was incredible,” said Jesus Rojas, Natali Rojas’ father.
            The family is taking the statue’s survival as a sign that they can make it, too.
            “Appreciate what you have, listen to the warnings, hug your children and thank God for today and yesterday, and pray for a better tomorrow,” Natali Rojas said.

            Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/28/us/harvey-fire-statue-trnd/index.html

            Day care driver expected to face charges after boy found dead in van

            (CNN)A Florida day care center employee is expected to face charges after a 3-year-old boy was found dead in a parked van, police in Orlando said Tuesday.

            Myles Hill was found on the floor at the back of the van parked at the Little Miracles Academy day care center around 6:30 p.m. on Monday, police told reporters. Police Chief John Mina said authorities believe he had been in the vehicle since around 9 a.m. that morning. The high temperature in Orlando on Monday was about 93 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Weather Underground.
            The cause of Myles’ death has not been determined, but Mina said that based on the evidence, it is believed to be heat-related. “This was an absolute tragedy that could have been prevented,” Mina told reporters on Tuesday.
              The van is used by employees to transport children from one day care location to another — as well as pick them up and drop them off at their homes.
              Mina said an employee, who has not been named publicly, had used the van Monday to move a group of children, including Myles, from one location to another. The employee dropped the children off and returned the van to the first location at around 9 a.m. It then sat in the parking lot until police were called later that night.It was unclear whether the employee locked the van after using it.
              Myles would have turned 4 on August 22.
              The Little Miracles Academy could not be reached by CNN. Multiple calls were unanswered and the website for the day care was down.

              No head count taken

              Employees found Myles’ body after his grandmother and legal guardian called the center because he was not dropped off at home that afternoon. Family members said employees at the center told them that Myles had not been seen at the day care center all day, according to CNN affiliate News 13.
              Vivian Chaney, who identified herself as Myles’ aunt to News 13, said that Myles’ attendance never came up when family members called the center on Monday to ask about school uniforms. “There should have been some kind of head count,” Chaney told News 13.
              The employee who drove the van allegedly told police there was no head count of the children when they were dropped off at the second location — and staff did not realize Myles was still in the van. Mina said he was unaware of any procedure the academy had for contacting families when a child who was expected at the center did not arrive.
              Mina said there are charges pending against the employee, but refused to expand on what the charges might be — and did not identify the individual involved. An autopsy is being conducted and charges will be filed once it is complete, Mina said.
              If Myles’ death is determined to be heat-related, he will be the 32nd child this year to die in a hot car in the United States — and the fifth in Florida, police said. An average of 37 children die each year in hot cars, according to safety organization Kids and Cars.

              Center closed ‘until further notice’

              Inspection reports from the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) indicate that Little Miracles Academy has failed to comply with multiple standards for personnel records, supervision and transportation, dating back to 2015.
              In June 2015, the DCF found that staff had failed to include a signed Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Requirements form in its personnel records. According to the department, all child care personnel are required by law to report any “suspicions of child abuse, neglect or abandonment.”
              In March 2017, the department found that staff were not “within sight and hearing” of the children during nap time. In July, the department said the facility’s transportation log failed to include multiple required elements, including destination and arrival times and locations.
              Mina told reporters Tuesday that the DCF is conducting an “operational investigation” of Little Miracles Academy in response to Myles’ death.
              According to a tweet from News 13 reporter Jerry Hume, a note has been placed on the doors of Little Miracles Academy that says “closed until further notice.”

              Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/08/us/orlando-day-care-van-death/index.html

              NAACP issues its first statewide travel advisory, for Missouri

              (CNN)The NAACP is sending a strong message to people of color traveling through Missouri: Go at your own risk.

              The organization is circulating a travel advisory after the state passed a law that Missouri’s NAACP conference says allows for legal discrimination. The warning cites several discriminatory incidents in Missouri, included as examples of “looming danger” in the state.
              The NAACP says this is the first travel advisory ever issued by the organization, at the state or national level. The Missouri conference initially published the advisory in June, and it was recognized nationally at the NAACP’s annual convention last week.
                “Individuals traveling in the state are advised to travel with extreme CAUTION,” the advisory warns. “Race, gender and color based crimes have a long history in Missouri.”

                Why now?

                The advisory was issued after Senate Bill 43 — which makes it more difficult for employees to prove their protected class, like race or gender, directly led to unlawful discrimination — passed through the Missouri Legislature in June. Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens signed it into law soon after.
                Greitens and other supporters of the bill have said it puts Missouri’s standards for lawsuits in line with other states.
                But that’s not how the NAACP sees it. The Missouri NAACP State Conference called the legislation a “Jim Crow Bill.”
                “This does not follow the morals of Missouri,” Conference President Rod Chapel Jr. told CNN. “I hate to see Missouri get dragged down deep past the notion of treating people with dignity.”
                There have been other instances of discrimination in the state that could have elicited an advisory before this, several of which are listed in the warning. Among them are racist incidents reported at the University of Missouri that prompted protests across campus in 2015, as well as the state attorney general’s annual report that found black drivers were stopped by police at a rate 75% higher than white drivers.
                Chapel said he met with Greitens about the Senate bill several times. After the bill passed, he said they had a “fair and frank discussion” about what the legislation would do. At a later meeting, Chapel said he brought several faith leaders in the community to talk with the governor about theology and morality.
                “Ultimately, none of that worked,” Chapel said.
                Neither the governor’s office nor the Missouri Division of Tourism responded to multiple requests for comment.

                What does it mean?

                The advisory doesn’t tell people to not go to Missouri. Rather, the NAACP wants minority travelers to be aware of what it says are potential risks.
                “People should tell their relatives if they have to travel through the state, they need to be aware,” Chapel said. “They should have bail money, you never know.”
                In the advisory, the NAACP urges individuals to “warn your families, co-workers and anyone visiting Missouri to beware of the safety concerns with travel in Missouri.” These concerns, the organization writes, could include unnecessary search and seizures and potential arrest.
                Traditionally, travel advisories are released ahead of severe weather or political disruptions. The State Department publishes international travel warnings and alerts for countries with ongoing violence, frequent terrorist attacks or increased health risks, to name a few.
                The ACLU has issued travel advisories similar to the NAACP’s in the past: one for Arizona in 2010, and one in Texas earlier this year. Both advisories were circulated after state laws passed allowing law enforcement officers to question a person’s immigration status.

                What will it take for the advisory to be lifted?

                After SB43 passed through the Legislature, the initial travel advisory was supposed to last until August 28, when the bill would potentially go into effect.
                That changed when Greitens signed it into law.
                “We see this travel advisory remaining in effect for the foreseeable future,” Chapel said.
                He wants to see several changes in the state before the advisory is lifted, starting with the repeal of the law that prompted the advisory in the first place.
                Chapel also said there should be a plan in place on how the state is going to address people of color being stopped by police at a disproportionate rate. He also wants to see a change in how Missouri prosecutors handle hate crimes.
                “We need to have some basic ground rules for how human beings treat each other,” Chapel said.

                Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/02/us/naacp-missouri-travel-advisory-trnd/index.html

                Oklahoma sheriff, 5 others indicted in prisoner’s death

                (CNN)An Oklahoma sheriff and five other people have been indicted in the death of a prisoner who was held in a restraint chair more than 48 hours without adequate food, water or medical care, authorities said.

                He was placed in a restraint chair June 6, found unresponsive in the chair June 8 and pronounced dead at the jail that day, the release said. During his time in the chair, Huff was not given “proper amounts of food, water or medical treatment for illnesses he was suffering from,” the release said.
                In documents released this week, state authorities announced that second-degree manslaughter charges had been filed against Jerry Niles, 53, sheriff of Garfield County since 2013. Enid, the Garfield County seat, is about 115 miles west of Tulsa.
                  Others charged with second-degree manslaughter were jail administrator Jennifer Niles, 34; assistant jail administrator John Markus, 29; detention officer Shawn Galusha, 37; nurse practitioner Lela Goatley, 57; and licensed practical nurse Vanisa Gay, 38.
                  CNN reached out to the lawyer representing Jerry Niles and a lawyer representing three of the other defendants for comment, but has not received a reply.
                  Court documents do not detail what roles they played in Huff’s death. The charge can be punished by two to four years in prison, up to one year in a county jail or $1,000 fine, the attorney general’s office said.
                  An autopsy performed June 9, 2016, said Huff died of natural causes, with the probable cause of death being chronic alcoholism due to a compulsive condition from a prior disease.
                  Through their lawyer, the Huff family issued a statement saying they appreciate the time prosecutors and the grand jury “have devoted to fully understand the horrific circumstances surrounding the death of their loved one, and their willingness to hold those who are responsible accountable for their actions.”
                  In a federal lawsuit filed June 6, 2017, lawyers allege jail employees were negligent because they should have known about Huff’s medical conditions from previous incarcerations and been aware that he took medications for heart disease, hypertension, depression and other conditions.
                  Huff started hallucinating and exhibiting delusions at some point during his incarceration and was placed in the restraint chair, the lawsuit says.
                  Jail personnel didn’t receive a medical recommendation to use the chair, the lawsuit says, and jail employees didn’t check his blood pressure regularly, didn’t give him blood pressure medication and didn’t offer him hydration every two hours.
                  Jail policy required the employees to check on Huff every 15 minutes but they didn’t do so, the lawsuit says.
                  A response filed by Jerry Niles’ lawyer denies most of the allegations in the civil complaint, says the jail staff was property trained and says Huff’s constitutional rights were not violated.
                  The defendants in the lawsuit are Jerry Niles, Jennifer Niles, Lela Goatley, three John Does (individuals who will be named later), the Garfield County Detention Center, the Garfield County Board of Commissioners and Turn Key Health Clinics, a company that provides health care to the jail.

                  Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/26/us/oklahoma-prisoner-death/index.html

                  Honorary Alaska ‘mayor,’ Stubbs the cat, dies at 20

                  (CNN)In today’s political climate, catty politicians claw for every vote, but the mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska, was different. His ability to unite through cuddles and his fondness for naps made him remarkable, and this mayor — Stubbs the cat — also proved that opposable thumbs aren’t necessary for success in politics.

                  The honorary mayor of the small Alaska town, elected as a write-in in 1997 due to a paucity of viable human candidates, died at age 20, according to a Saturday news release from his owners.
                  “He was a trouper until the very last day of his life,” Stubbs’ owners said. “You are are a remarkable cat and we will dearly miss you.”

                    A life in the spotlight

                    Stubbs served Talkeetna for 20 years. His office, at Nagley’s Store, became a destination for locals and tourists alike who sought sage council from the cat.
                    And although Stubbs lacked the legislative and rhetorical prowess of a typical politician, he always did well in the polls.
                    “Over 75% of visitors ask ‘Where’s the mayor?’ or come in with this statement ‘I have an appointment with the mayor,'” the news release said. “I think we heard those two statements over 100 times a day during our first year.”
                    Stubbs’ career wasn’t completely free of controversy, though.
                    In 2013, Stubbs suffered a vicious attack from a neighborhood dog that left him sidelined in a hospital.
                    But even a punctured lung, fractured sternum and deep lacerations couldn’t keep him from his duties. Stubbs recovered and assumed all his previous mayoral responsibilities.

                    A steady health decline

                    Although he loved the attention as a kitten and younger cat, Stubbs’ life in the public eye eventually began to wear on him.
                    He began a retreat from public life in 2015 due to old age, and he cut back on visits to the store, according to the news release.
                    By 2017, Stubbs just wasn’t having it anymore.
                    “Stubbs did a couple TV shows and more than a handful of interviews, but was not fond of the camera and all the people; it had gotten to be too much for him,” his owners said.
                    In the wake of his death, his owners hinted another of their kittens, Denali, may assume his role.
                    “We couldn’t have asked for a better understudy than Denali — he really has followed in Stubbs’ pawprints in just about everything.”

                    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/23/us/mayor-cat-stubbs-dies-at-20/index.html

                    Tennessee county inmates get reduced jail time for getting a vasectomy

                    (CNN)Yes, you read that right. Inmates in White County, Tennessee, can shave 30 days off their jail sentence if they undergo an elective birth control procedure.

                    Both male and female inmates can volunteer for the new program. Women receive a Nexplanon implant in their arm, which provides up to three years of continuous birth control. Men undergo a vasectomy. The procedures are free and conducted by the Tennessee Department of Health.
                    General Sessions Judge Sam Benningfield signed a standing order on May 15 enforcing the program.
                      “I hope to encourage them to take personal responsibility and give them a chance, when they do get out, not to be burdened with children,” Benningfield told CNN affiliate WTVF. “This gives them a chance to get on their feet and make something of themselves.”
                      Since the program started, 32 women and 38 men have volunteered. The men are currently waiting to have the vasectomies performed.
                      “I understand it won’t be entirely successful, but if you reach two or three people, maybe that’s two or three kids not being born under the influence of drugs. I see it as a win-win,” Benningfield said.

                      Controversy over new program

                      Not everyone is enthusiastic about the idea. District Attorney Bryant Dunaway and the ACLU are speaking against the ethics and legality of it.
                      “Those decisions are personal in nature and I think that’s just something the court system should not encourage or mandate,” Dunaway told WTVF.
                      Dunaway has instructed his staff not to make any arrangements involving the birth control program.
                      “Offering a so-called ‘choice’ between jail time and coerced contraception or sterilization is unconstitutional,” said Hedy Weinberg, ACLU-TN executive director, in a statement.
                      “Judges play an important role in our community — overseeing individuals’ childbearing capacity should not be part of that role.”

                      Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/20/us/white-county-inmate-vasectomy-trnd/index.html